Why sales should give a crap about what marketing is doing

Let’s keep going on the theme of marketing and sales alignment. Last week someone told me that sales doesn’t care what marketing is doing, and expecting them to take time to look at marketing activities on a lead record is ridiculous, because they won’t do it. I call B.S. on that, and refuse to accept it. While that may be true in some sales organizations, it’s not right. In fact, it’s madness. Utter madness!

First, I want to establish 2 baseline assumptions. For the sake of the following post assume that:

  1. Marketing has done its job and has implemented a Marketing Automation Platform (MAP) that thoroughly integrates with you CRM and is publishing marketing interaction information to the lead records in the CRM
  2. Sales people are sane, rational and logical

Now, I’d like to set the stage with some interesting numbers:

~ 4 ~

The average number of marketing campaigns B2B companies report a lead responds to before a deal closes (Insight Squared)

~ 7 ~

The minimum number of interactions the average B2B lead has with a brand before they are ready to talk to a sales person (Online Marketing Institute)

~ 38 ~

The win rate increase reported by organizations that have focused on tightly aligning their sales and marketing teams (SAP)

~ 50 ~

The percent of time B2B sales people waste on unproductive prospecting (SAP) AND the percent of B2B sales people that miss their quota (Marketo)

~ 70 ~

The percent of the purchase cycle that’s complete before a lead is ready to talk to sales (Forbes)

~ 95 ~

The percent of B2B buyers that downloaded a piece of thought-leadership content from the vendor they ultimately chose (SAP)

Because you’re a smart, well-read person of business, most of these insights should be familiar to you. After all, I haven’t exactly chosen an original topic. But I’m going to belabor the point because it’s an important one. Armed with all of this info, I hope it is clear to you that for sales to ignore the insights into what leads are doing before they get them on the phone would be utter insanity.

Did you not immediately jump to that obvious and rational conclusion? If not <<face palm>> read on…

cooper-gosling-web
You’re welcome.

Once upon a time there were 2 (beautiful) leads: Joe Blow and Jon Doe

Joe Blow is the kind of lead we dream of. He heard great things about your business from a friend and it just so happened he was in the market for exactly your solution and he needed it fast.  So Joe went to your website and submitted a ‘contact sales’ form. In that form, he submitted comments that outlined who referred him, what he wanted, and his timeline to buy.

Awesome, right? Totally! When sales calls Joe, would they want to say “Hi Joe, I understand you wanted to talk to a sales person, how can I help?” or would they want to be ready with a quote and proposal for how they can help address his specific need immediately? The latter, I would hope. Arming sales with even that small nugget of info can help them have an informed conversation that will get them off on the right foot and both Joe and sales would live happily ever after.

Jon Doe, on the other hand, is not so sure what he wants. He finds your company as he’s doing some research on possible solutions to his widget challenge. He has 7 magical interactions with your company: 1) Visits your website; 2) Downloads a white paper; 3) Receives an email; 4) Opens an email; 5) Clicks through the email; 6) Visits your website again; 7) Downloads an infographic.

Jon is an attractive lead, too but he’s harder to get. He looks exactly like the kind of guy you want to sell to (and by that I mean he meets the profile of your company’s standard buyer), and based on everything he’s doing, marketing thinks he’s qualified enough for sales to have a go at him (lucky ducks!) But Jon didn’t actually ask to speak to sales, so when sales calls him, what do they say?

Hi – my marketing team says you have a high lead score so I’m calling you – what’s up? Anything I can sell you?” Hm…probably not. How about “Hi Jon – I saw that you downloaded our white paper on 10 Tips for Improving your Widget ROI and our infographic on the Lifecycle of a Widget. Was that helpful for you? Are there any widget initiatives I can help you with or can I connect you with a widget expert?

Call me crazy (you wouldn’t be the first person), but I think that second talk track might get more traction. The key to enabling that conversation is insight. All sales has to do is take an extra moment to look at the behavioral history and marketing interactions of that lead and BOOM! that conversations is much more informed and much more likely to land a sale.

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